Top Crypto News – 18/10/2017

WHY SILICON VALLEY IS GOING GAGA FOR BITCOIN

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Should I buy bitcoin? As a technology reporter, the questions I receive from random people at birthday parties, say, or seatmates on a plane, are usually emblematic of what is going on in the digital world. (And, increasingly, the real one, too, for that matter.) Not too long ago, the predominant question was Should I buy the new iPhone? Then it became Do I need to be on Twitter? or Do I need to be on Facebook? or Do I need to be on Snapchat? (That question has since come full circle to Should I quit Twitter and Facebook?) These days, the question I hear the most—well, besides whether Twitter should ban Trump—is Should I buy bitcoin?

I usually respond with the story of Laszlo Hanyecz. If you’ve come within 500 feet of bitcoin, or any other cryptocurrency, over the past few years, the name alone will make you cringe. Back in 2010, when the currency was in its infancy, Hanyecz went “mining” for bitcoins for a few months and collected 10,000 of them; he subsequently traded them, in what would be the first cryptocurrency transaction in history, to a guy who bought him two Papa John’s pizzas with a couple sides of that tasty, buttery garlic sauce. Back then, Hanyecz’s bitcoins had no value, and the $30 value of two pies and an accoutrement made his individual bitcoin units worth 0.003 cents apiece. Today, at their current market valuation, bitcoin units are worth around $5,800 each, which means Hanyecz’s 10,000 bitcoins would be worth around $58 million. “It wasn’t like bitcoins had any value back then, so the idea of trading them for a pizza was incredibly cool,” Hanyecz told me in 2013, when bitcoin was already valued at $1,242 each. “No one knew it was going to get so big.”

For a lot of people on the periphery of this technology, the extraordinary rise in bitcoin’s value has become cause for alarm. The Web is littered with news articles, blog posts, and white papers warning that bitcoin and its sibling currencies are worth nothing, and the rise and fall of the currencies’ worth, which can fluctuate by billions of dollars a minute, certainly backs that up. But while Jamie Dimon and other bankers might scoff at these digital currencies, Silicon Valley is extremely bullish. There’s a reason, too: if Dimon had invested in bitcoin when he first called it a joke, in 2015, he would have received a tenfold return on his investment.

There are a number of reasons why bitcoin and cryptocurrencies are doing so well right now. One of the more plausible scenarios was outlined this week in a very clever post written by Adam Ludwin, an investor and co-founder of Chain.com, a bitcoin developer platform, which argues that bitcoin is an entirely new asset class, similar to equities and bonds, and that “bitcoin is capitalism, distilled.” The “capitalism” part of the sentence helps explain why some in Silicon Valley are so specifically exuberant about it right now. “In the short-run, there will be extreme volatility as FOMO competes with FUD, confusion competes with understanding, and greed competes with fear (on both the buyer side and the issuer side),” Ludwin wrote. “Most people buying into crypto assets have checked their judgement at the door.”

This gets someone like me a bit nervous about what cryptocurrencies could end up doing to society in the long run. Silicon Valley culture is largely fueled by people who love to decimate industries that don’t work, often without any thought of how the disruption could lead to other negative results happening in society (see the recent social-media debacle around the election ). In typical Valley fantasy, people are seeing only the positive potential with bitcoin, not the potentially ugly outcomes when humans molest it for their own interests.

One of the many factors currently fueling the ascent of bitcoin is the rise of initial coin offerings, or I.C.O.s, where some lucky investors are reaping astounding returns. You can think of these like a traditional initial public offering, or I.P.O., but without the layers upon layers of regulation and government bureaucracy that come with a company going public. With an I.C.O., a start-up raises money for a new venture by selling “coins” that are very similar to shares of a public company. The coins then rise and fall as the company’s value oscillates. In 2014, when the founding of a new cryptocurrency called Ethereum was announced, it raised $18 million by selling a new digital coin called “Ether” for 40 cents per coin. Today, Ethereum has a market cap of around $30 billion. So if you had spent $100 on Ether during the I.C.O., you would have made $74,900 in profit. As Nathaniel Popper detailed in The New York Times earlier this summer, I.C.O.s have been generating billions of dollars in returns for some—and a lot of scams, too.

The lack of regulation in the cryptocurrency world, after all, means that there is a lot of fraud, extreme volatility, and coin values can jump up or down in mere seconds. Someone I recently spoke with who works with, and monitors, the crypto I.C.O. markets pointed out that some of these I.C.O.s feel awfully similar to the Dot Com public offerings of the late 90s, where the public was buying into nothing and ended up with exactly that when the entire market came crashing down and trillions of dollars were wiped off the stock market. In China, I.C.O.s became so troubling that they were banned earlier this year. In September, the People’s Bank of China issued a blunt statement saying that this practice was “illegal and disruptive to economic and financial stability.” I.C.O.s in China were occurring at an astounding rate, with one report claiming that more than $750 million was raised in I.C.O.s in July and August alone. A lot of people think the ban by China is temporary, slowing the dizzying speed of these offerings.

As a result of all the movement in the cryptocurrency market over the past couple of years, there are a lot of options out there for people who want to try their hand in crypto-investing. There’s bitcoin, the first and most well known of all the currencies, which currently oscillates in value at around $5,000 a coin. I’ve heard predictions all over the map, from bitcoins one day being worth as much as $500,000 each to units being worth absolutely nothing if a better coin comes along. (My personal prediction is that they will continue to rise for at least the next couple of years.) Ether had remained relatively flat until earlier this year when it spiked in value to over $350 apiece. (It’s since fallen to $300 each.) The current coin du jour is called Litecoin, which is getting a lot of attention because it’s still priced relatively low, at around $55 each, and is expected to rise considerably over the next year or so on account of new features that will be added to enable more privacy options. Then there are a slew of other coins to explore, including Monero, which is an open-source currency that was developed in April 2014, but which spiked this year after the illegal drug market AlphaBay was taken down. Monero, unlike other currencies, is truly anonymous, making it the perfect currency with which to buy and sell drugs, guns, and other illegal contraband on the Dark Web. If you look at the World Coin Index Web site, you can see a long list of other coins and their values over time, including Ripple, Bitcoin Cash, Qtum, NEO, Nav Coin, NEM, and a number of other coins.

For Silicon Valley, betting on one of these early can mean profiting beyond all imagination, exceeding even the famed 1,000x start-up returns from companies like Facebook and Uber. Earlier this summer, I interviewed Tyler and Cameron Winklevoss, the twins who co-founded The Facebook with Mark Zuckerberg, and they are now obsessively investing in cryptocurrencies. In a settlement with Facebook, the two brothers were awarded $60 million, but to hear them talk about it, it appears their investments in bitcoin and other currencies are going to reap a far bigger return over time. I’ve spoken with countless other people about the current state of bitcoin and cryptocurrency, and I’ve heard two truths that seems consistent. No one—and I mean no one—knows exactly which digital currency will be successful in the future. It could be bitcoin, it could be Litecoin, it could be something that hasn’t even been created yet. But, the other resounding feeling is that these currencies are here to stay in one form or another and there is nothing anyone can do to stop them. Which brings me back to that question that I’m often asked these days: “should I buy bitcoin?”

As a result of all the movement in the cryptocurrency market over the past couple of years, there are a lot of options out there for people who want to try their hand in crypto-investing. There’s bitcoin, the first and most well known of all the currencies, which currently oscillates in value at around $5,000 a coin. I’ve heard predictions all over the map, from bitcoins one day being worth as much as $500,000 each to units being worth absolutely nothing if a better coin comes along. (My personal prediction is that they will continue to rise for at least the next couple of years.) Ether had remained relatively flat until earlier this year when it spiked in value to over $350 apiece. (It’s since fallen to $300 each.) The current coin du jour is called Litecoin, which is getting a lot of attention because it’s still priced relatively low, at around $55 each, and is expected to rise considerably over the next year or so on account of new features that will be added to enable more privacy options. Then there are a slew of other coins to explore, including Monero, which is an open-source currency that was developed in April 2014, but which spiked this year after the illegal drug market AlphaBay was taken down. Monero, unlike other currencies, is truly anonymous, making it the perfect currency with which to buy and sell drugs, guns, and other illegal contraband on the Dark Web. If you look at the World Coin Index Web site, you can see a long list of other coins and their values over time, including Ripple, Bitcoin Cash, Qtum, NEO, Nav Coin, NEM, and a number of other coins.

For Silicon Valley, betting on one of these early can mean profiting beyond all imagination, exceeding even the famed 1,000x start-up returns from companies like Facebook and Uber. Earlier this summer, I interviewed Tyler and Cameron Winklevoss, the twins who co-founded The Facebook with Mark Zuckerberg, and they are now obsessively investing in cryptocurrencies. In a settlement with Facebook, the two brothers were awarded $60 million, but to hear them talk about it, it appears their investments in bitcoin and other currencies are going to reap a far bigger return over time. I’ve spoken with countless other people about the current state of bitcoin and cryptocurrency, and I’ve heard two truths that seems consistent. No one—and I mean no one—knows exactly which digital currency will be successful in the future. It could be bitcoin, it could be Litecoin, it could be something that hasn’t even been created yet. But, the other resounding feeling is that these currencies are here to stay in one form or another and there is nothing anyone can do to stop them. Which brings me back to that question that I’m often asked these days: “should I buy bitcoin?”

There’s an old saying in real estate that “you shouldn’t wait to buy, but rather you should buy and then wait.” That’s the way I feel about these cryptocurrencies. If you’re looking for a quick and dramatic financial boost, realize that you could probably get similar odds by buying a plane ticket to Las Vegas, walking into the first casino you see, and putting all your money on black or red. But, if you’re willing to wait it out, there’s a chance that your investment in a cryptocurrency could make for an impressive return over time. Just be prepared to go it the long haul. Or at least until the price spikes tomorrow.

Written by Vanity Fair

 

Bitcoin is not the new gold, Goldman Sachs says

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  • Cryptocurrencies like bitcoin are not the “new gold,” Goldman Sachs said
  • Bitcoin wallets are vulnerable to being hacked and the price is highly volatile, Goldman noted
  • The investment bank said that precious metals are “still the best long-term store of value”

Cryptocurrencies like bitcoin are not the “new gold,” Goldman Sachs said in a note, advising investors that precious metals “remain a relevant asset class” in portfolios.

In a note to clients earlier this week, Goldman detailed the benefits of holding gold in a portfolio.

“The use of precious metals is not a historical accident – they are still the best long-term store of value out of the known elements,” the investment bank said.

But it also addressed the rise of cryptocurrencies. Many commentators have dubbed bitcoin “digital gold” because of the fact it has a finite supply and has at times seen price rises due to geopolitical tensions.

Goldman concluded that bitcoin is not a good store of value versus gold.

“Gold wins out over cryptocurrencies in a majority of the key characteristics of money,” Goldman said.

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The analysts said that digital wallets, where people can store cryptocurrencies, are vulnerable to hacking, and virtual currencies also have “significant regulatory risks.” For example, China recently banned cryptocurrency exchanges and put a stop to initial coin offerings (ICOs), the new way for start-ups to raise money by issuing digital tokens.

Goldman also said that cryptocurrencies are subject to network or infrastructure risk during a crisis. For example, there was a “hard fork” this summer when bitcoin split to create a new cryptocurrency called bitcoin cash.

Some regulators, like those in Japan, have allowed bitcoin to be used as a form of payment. Bitcoin can also be broken down into much smaller units. While this may make it look like a better medium of exchange than gold, Goldman said that transaction fees have risen sharply this year. The average transaction fee at its peak in mid-July was just below $9, according to bitinfocharts.com.

The investment bank said that gold is not subject to competition from alternatives. Bitcoin has rival virtual currencies like Monero or Dash for example. There are over 1,000 cryptocurrencies in existence.

And finally, Goldman said that gold “is clearly better at holding its purchasing power, and has much lower daily volatility.” The note said that bitcoin’s volatility averaged almost seven times that of gold in 2017.

The price of spot gold is up over 10 percent this year. Bitcoin meanwhile is up over 400 percent. However, the cryptocurrency has had wild swings in price.

“Cryptocurrencies are not the ‘new gold’ despite their recent popularity,” Goldman concluded.

Written by CNBC

China’s ‘Bitcoin Ban’ No Match For Stateless Cryptocurrency Market

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It’s official, blockchain technology has beat one of the biggest authorities on earth. The decentralized nature of what has become the backbone of the cryptocurrency craze has proven its mettle. Bitcoin, and a host of other highly speculative digital currencies live another day.

Last month, China banned mainland residents from trading in cryptocurrencies on exchanges and made it illegal for Chinese start-ups to raise funds via initial coin offerings, a hybrid of crowdfunding, venture capital and initial public offerings, to put it simply. Bitcoin prices fell. Ether prices fell. And then cryptocurrency start-ups shook it all off. It was as if they were punched in the face, shook the cobwebs out of their head, and remembered that this whole blockchain thing is decentralized and autonomous. That’s the point. Banned in one country, move to another. Now they’re back on their feet in most cases, like a terminator cyborg hard to knock down.

Bitcoin prices are over $5,000.

China’s regulations might have stopped a few start-ups for raising funds, but the general consensus is that this is temporary.

“The ethos behind blockchain has been tested,” says Ken Sangha, COO of Open Money and the Open Project in San Francisco. “A central, organized and powerful authority — China — said ‘no’ and we all have been tested worldwide because of it. But the system flexed its muscles. It’s doing what it was supposed to do.”

Sit. Stay. Good Dog.

Not even an obedient service dog can sit still forever.

Sangha was going to launch an ICO in September for Open Money, a developers platform like Java that would allow app makers to include user options to purchase their products with cryptocurrencies in app stores. The Chinese ban put their ICO on hold. Most of their investors were Chinese. Start-ups from San Francisco to Moscow had similar problems.

Malta-based Providence Casino, a physical, crypto coin casino being planned and shooting for an ICO this year was initially targeting Chinese investors in the mainland. They were banned from doing so. Instead of marketing to Chinese en masse, investors are only brought on board if they have personal relationships with the company founders, a sort of who-you-know system of project finance networking.

Chinese augmented reality start-up Metaverse reportedly lost out on a number of cross-border tie-ups and other deals. Its CEO Eric Gu did not want to talk on the record.

Shanghai-based exchange C2CX had to temporarily scrap their planned joint venture with a Russian company called KickICO as key money men like CyberTrust of Switzerland dropped out for now. That project, a China-Russia exchange for Chinese investors to buy tokens of Russian start-ups listing on KickICO is still planned once the dust settles on the regulatory environment, the two partners said.

“China is a main source of crypto investing and the bans just mean that that capital will go to projects based elsewhere because the local ICO platforms will not be able to attract new start-ups,” says Scott Freeman, CEO of C2CX. “For China, financing their blockchain companies is just going to happen outside of China. For foreigners looking to tap Chinese money, they will either wait a while or look elsewhere. People are adjusting.”

Companies are adjusting. Chinese blockchain developer Bibox simply moved to Estonia.

“Let’s put it this way, they opened up in Estonia after the ban and moved fast,” says Vlad Dobrov, a blockchain investing consultant based in Singapore. “As you can clearly see from their website, from every angle, they are targeting Chinese investors. Their founders all came from the top Chinese exchange. They know what they are doing.”

There are ways around the ban, everyone will tell you. They include more peer-to-peer investing done in private rather than the traditional Kickstarter-esque crowdfunding method that some start-ups use on ICO platforms like KickICO in Moscow, now gathering hundreds of new tech companies, including American ones.

That means that clearly non-Chinese ICOs didn’t kill their start-up funding plans because of bans in China (and subsequent bans in South Korea). Instead, most put their plans to launch on pause to figure out ways to legitimize their activity and find the right investors now that simple crowdsourcing these things in China is illegal under the ban. Chinese with crypto wallet accounts in Singapore, Hong Kong, London and elsewhere are still buying tokens of companies listing on exchanges and still speculating in cryptocurrencies.

Open Money found Chinese smart money. They built relationships with Chinese venture funds over the years and private asset managers who are now delving into the crypto markets. Those characters in China are known as “whales”. The whales tend to be large funds with tens of millions of dollars to throw around, often belonging to the family offices of Chinese multi-millionaires and billionaires.

“We are definitely getting Chinese money and are still talking to a number of China-based funds,” Sangha says.

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Truly Stateless

Nearly all of these new start-ups are developing technology reliant on cryptocurrency as a finance or payment mechanism. All of them are tied into the autonomous, decentralized digital ledger blockchain technologies, and bypassing venture capitalists who demand equity in exchange for investment capital. They are all similar in their statelessness. Their founders are often based in countries that are not their first homes. Russians in San Francisco. Chinese in Tallin, Estonia. Their brain power is often separate from their legal offices; offices that are easily movable to other cities and states. Their marketing team is holed up somewhere in the Italian Alps. Unlike Apple and Facebook stocks dominated by American shareholders, their investor base is global, though increasingly Asian.

They exist in a sort of virtual, science fiction world and don’t have factories or skyscrapers. Their companies can be created in a WeWork rental office, or condo in St. Kitts with good wifi. They launch an ICO and become overnight millionaires. It is a lot like being a garage band with the audience size of Bruce Springsteen, deadmau5, Taylor Swift, and Beyonce, combined. No wonder everyone is doing it. They’re everywhere and nowhere at the same time, and for this reason, the powerful Chinese government has failed to put a dent in demand for anything cryptocurrency related.

On the other hand, the question is, does China really want to ban it?

Most people with first-hand insights into the market there will say no.

Red Pulse, a Shanghai-based market intelligence platform covering China’s economy and capital markets, did an ICO on Oct. 8 and raised $30 million in 10 minutes, despite being closed to Chinese citizens. That’s double what they were hoping for.

Ian Holtz, founder of Orion Technologies in Denver is now in Barcelona running a new start-up called Aphelion. They’re building on a Chinese platform, the biggest one of them all, called NEO. Red Pulse launched on NEO. Like everyone else in the blockchain community, Aphelion is going to create their own product token in an ICO planned sometime next month, hoping to follow Red Pulse’s path on the NEO platform in raising a few million bucks in a matter of minutes.

“NEO took a little hit because the crackdown raised some eyebrows, but I think it is to their benefit in the long run,” Holtz says, thinking NEO can beat the competition. “NEO is working directly with the Chinese government to carve out what regulations will ultimately look like. They’ve proven themselves in China. I think there is actually some pride in Beijing at what NEO has accomplished,” he says.

This month, Communist Party leaders will meet with fund managers and major cryptocurrency operators to hammer out what to do about regulations. If they want to centralize something that is innately designed to be decentralized, they will lose out. China money is already going offshore, and it is not just doing it to buy real estate anymore. It’s going offshore to invest in digital assets.

“We’ve had many investors from China with mutual investment agreements of $10 million or more and now all of them plan to register funds outside of the country where it is easier for them to participate in ICOs,” says Alex Bessonov, CEO of Silicon Valley-based BitClave, a company building search-data privacy software powered by blockchain technology. “It’s entirely proper for the Chinese government to seek protections for consumers and prevent investor fraud. But to confine capital raising as the central bank would do is to ignore the enormous societal value that blockchain technology presents,” Bessonov says.

Chinese regulators clearly wanted to avoid panic in the market. ICOs were being launched like fireworks on a Chinese New Year. The central bank demanded companies return funds to their investors. Most of them did, only to get the money back through Hong Kong and Singapore based bank accounts, sources in China who wished to remain anonymous said.

Other firms working with high net worth Chinese in Shanghai and New York said mainlanders just set up shop in Hong Kong. “Everyone is looking for fast money in China, and liquidity to get in and out of an investment,” says Tristan Zhang, managing director of Helix Capital. “We know where a lot of them went; they went right to Hong Kong and did their ICOs there instead.”

Chinese investing culture is casino-like. Some new coins have literally doubled overnight once retail Chinese investors got a hold of them. The last thing Beijing wants to see is a bunch of unsophisticated investors losing thousands in speculative investments in start-ups that have no assets, no income stream, and may even be nothing but snake oil.

“I think regulatory efforts should focus on containing and limiting the potential for harm,” says Bessonov. “We are hopeful ICOs will come back to China again.”

Written by Forbes

Indian Bitcoin Exchange Unocoin to Follow Majority Chain Post-SegWit2x

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Indian bitcoin exchange Unocoin has revealed its stance on the upcoming SegWit2x hard fork, stating that it will only support the majority blockchain following the split.

Unocoin to Follow Majority Blockchain

The startup made this announcement in a blog post, assuring its users that it will give them access to coins on both blockchains if a blockchain split occurs following the SegWit2x fork, which is scheduled for mid-November. However, it only intends to offer INR trading pairs for the majority blockchain, so users will have to withdraw coins from the minority chains into other wallets.

Unocoin says that they will determine the majority chain based on both mining and community support and will provide users to access to the minority coins within two weeks of the fork. The company adds that customers must withdraw the minority coins within four weeks of the split.

It is not surprising that Unocoin intends to base its decision on mining hashrate. The company is a New York Agreement signatory and was included in the list of SegWit2x supporters that were publicly denounced by Bitcoin.org.

Moreover, the exchange recently announced a partnership with bitcoin wallet Blockchain to enable Indian users to purchase bitcoins from Unocoin from within their Blockchain wallet. Since Blockchain plans to follow the chain with the most accumulated difficulty, chaos would ensue if the two companies were supporting separate chains.

Unocoin Policy Raises Questions

However, the Unocoin SegWit2x policy raises several questions. First, the company states that intend to consider “community support” alongside mining hashrate. How will that be measured, and what will the exchange do if miners support one chain and the community supports the other?

Second, the company’s policy includes this somewhat-curious statement:

“All our customers holding any amount of bitcoin in their Unocoin wallet before the event of the fork would be entitled to an equivalent amount of coins on both the chains after the split. There is no action required from customers in this regard either before or during the fork as long as the replay protection is available.”

It is not immediately clear what the company means when it states that customers do not need to take any action as long as replay protection is available. SegWit2x leaders including Jeff Garzik and Mike Belshe have signaled ardent opposition to opt-out replay protection, which would automatically protect users from replay attacks. Garzik is developing opt-in replay protection, but this will require user activation, a process that may be too complicated for people who are not tech-savvy. It is possible that Unocoin means that they will “taint” the coins to protect them from replay attacks before users are able to withdraw them, but this is not clear from the post.

CCN reached out to Unocoin for clarification about these issues and will update the article if they respond.

Featured image from Shutterstock.

 

Chinese Version of Google Baidu Joins Hyperledger. Who’s Next?

 

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Hyperledger announced that Baidu has joined the project as a Premier Member. The Executive Director of Hyperledger, Brian Behlendorf, on behalf of the project, warmly welcomed Baidu:

“It’s exciting to see a company like Baidu, which serves the world’s largest Internet user population, join Hyperledger. Their deep understanding in connecting users to information and services will be a tremendous experience for us to leverage, as we look to expand our reach further in Asia and drive more global production deployments of Hyperledger technology.”

Hyperledger, according to its website, is an open source collaborative effort created to advance cross-industry Blockchain technologies.

Created in 2015 by the Linux Foundation, Hyperledger has attracted many influential companieslike J.P. Morgan, Airbus, Intel, Cisco, and Wells Fargo. The project is a global Blockchain alliance with huge influence.

Vice President of Baidu, Zhang Xuyang, has reacted to the announcement saying:

“We believe Blockchain technology will allow us to better tailor our search technology to our users’ needs by enhancing the way we optimize local tastes and preferences. We’re thrilled to be part of Hyperledger, and look forward to collaborating with other members to drive open Blockchain solutions forward.”

After the Chinese government expelling Google, Baidu has become the dominant search engine in China. Now it is one of the largest Internet companies in China, as well as one of the major AI leaders all over the world. It is a member of “BAT”(Baidu, Alibaba, and Tencent), which is the Chinese version of “FLAG.”

Baidu is not the only giant Chinese tech company showing interest in Blockchain technology. In fact, it is left behind by its opponent.

In July 2016, Alibaba used Blockchain in its charity platform, making the information of donations more transparent. Then, by cooperating with different companies and purchasing start-ups, Alibaba applied Blockchain technology in multiple areas, including food safety and email security.

What’s more, Ant Financial, a subsidiary of Alibaba, has included Blockchain into its future developing areas along with AI, security, IoT and cloud computing.

It even tried to cooperate with the Chinese government on city construction, with Blockchain technology. Besides Alibaba, Tencent, the designer of WeChat and QQ, entered the Blockchain playground last year.

In May 2016, Tencent participated in the establishment of the Financial Blockchain Shenzhen Consortium, which is the largest Blockchain alliance in China. Tencent also included Blockchain into its future development plan.

Written by Coin Telegraph

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